Open Source Investigations Workshop

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Registration for Open Source Investigations Workshop coming soon.

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Open Source Investigations Workshop

Our five-day intensive workshop will provide hands-on training in open source investigations skills, legal, and digital security techniques required for collecting, analyzing and documenting publicly available online information for use in law, advocacy, or journalism. CLE credits available to lawyers.

“For decades, human rights investigators have relied on tools like shovels and backhoes to uncover mass graves and mass atrocities in places like Bosnia, Iraq, and Rwanda. But in today’s smartphone-filled world, videos and images of people killed or suffering thousands of miles away take only a couple of clicks to find on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter. The front lines of human rights work have shifted in the digital age, and a new generation of investigators is beginning to employ high-tech tools.” Cat Wise, Special Correspondent PBS Newshour

Course Overview

In this certificate earning workshop you will engage with leading academics, lawyers, advocates and cybersecurity experts to learn the tools and techniques of open source investigations. You will learn start-to-finish how to uncover the truth about disputed events, examining publicly available materials such as satellite images, social-media posts, videos, and online databases. You will learn advanced methods of searching for publicly accessible information, verifying the authenticity of that information, geo-locating relevant data, and archiving information. You will also have an opportunity to practice the skills you’ve just learned by launching your own investigations, with the guidance of expert instructors.

This workshop will provide you with the knowledge and tools necessary to apply your new skill set immediately to your profession. Lawyers: Please contact us if you are interested in earning CLE credits.

In this certificate workshop you will learn:

  • Substantive and procedural law
  • Methods for identifying and collecting digital evidence
  • Principles and practices based on the forthcoming international protocol on open source investigations
  • Ethics principles and ethical decision-making
  • Privacy and data protection regimes
  • Security practices, including risk assessment and mitigation strategies (digital, physical and psychosocial)
  • How to prepare an online investigation plan
  • Documentation and information management techniques
  • Advanced search and monitoring methods
  • Determining what to collect and how to collect it
  • Preservation and digital archiving
  • Source evaluation and attribution analysis
  • Verification methods for different types of online content
  • Social network and link analysis
  • Video and imagery comparison (including geolocation)
  • Tracking persons, movements and supply chains
  • Data visualization, mind-mapping and report writing
  • Resiliency tools, techniques, and strategies for effectively and appropriately handling emotionally challenging open source content

Plus, you’ll gain access to a larger community of professionals, resources and industry experts.


This workshop is a collaboration between the Human Rights Center at UC Berkeley School of Law and Berkeley Advanced Media Institute at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

 

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Our Training At Your Location

Interested in having us bring our training to your organization? Please contact Vicki Hammarstedt at vhammarstedt@berkeley.edu

Who Should Attend?

Ideal for lawyers, journalists, educators, human rights advocates, analysts, NGOs, & governments.

Need help justifying this training to your employer? Please check out our customizable document.

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Instructors & Facilitators

Instructors subject to change.

Stephanie Croft

Stephanie Croft is the Director of the Human Rights Investigations Lab at UC Berkeley School of Law. Croft is a geospatial analyst and open source investigator with a wide range of research experience related to West Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the Pacific. Prior to her appointment at Berkeley Law School, Croft worked as Senior Investigations Analyst for Greenpeace’s Global Tuna Campaign and was focused on investigating forced labor and human trafficking of workers at sea. She has also conducted open source investigations and analytical work for civil and criminal litigation in her native New Zealand. She is interested in feminist geography perspectives in environmental and human rights investigations and the implications of gender in the field of technology and human rights. She holds a BSc in Earth Science from the University of Amsterdam and is completing her MSc in Geographic Information Science at Amsterdam University.

Sam Dubberley

Sam Dubberley is the manager of the Digital Verification Corps in the Crisis Response Team at Amnesty International and research consultant for the Human Rights and Big Data Project at the University of Essex. As a fellow of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, Sam co-authored a global study exploring the use of user-generated content in TV and online news output. He has published further research into the impact of UGC and vicarious trauma with Eyewitness Media Hub and First Draft News. He serves on the advisory boards of First Draft News and the Syrian Archive, and is the co-editor, with Daragh Murray and Alexa Koenig, of the forthcoming book Digital Witness: Using Open Source Information for Human Rights Investigation, Documentation, and Accountability.

Lindsay Freeman

Lindsay Freeman is an international criminal and human rights lawyer based in The Hague, Netherlands. As a researcher for the Human Rights Center, she leads the drafting of the International Protocol on Open Source Investigations. Her research focuses on the use of technology and digital evidence war crimes investigations and prosecutions. She has provided training on digital evidence and online investigations to the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime, and national prosecutors’ offices. She serves on the World Economic Forum’s Global Futures Council for Technology and Human Rights, American Bar Association’s International Criminal Justice Expert Advisory Group, and International Criminal Court’s Technology Advisory Board. Previously, she worked for the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office, Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, and Google. She has an Adv. LL.M. in public international law from Leiden University, J.D. from University of San Francisco School of Law, and B.A. from Middlebury College.

Alexa Koenig

Alexa Koenig, Ph.D., J.D, is the Executive Director of the Human Rights Center (winner of the 2015 MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions) and a lecturer at UC Berkeley School of Law, where she teaches classes on human rights and international criminal law with a particular focus on the impact of emerging technologies on human rights practice. She co-founded the Human Rights Investigations Lab. Alexa has been honored with several awards for her work, including the United Nations Association-SF’s Global Human Rights Award, Mark Bingham Award for Excellence, the Eleanor Swift Award for Public Service, the Phi Beta Kappa Northern California Teaching Excellence Award, and diverse grants, including support from the National Science Foundation and numerous private foundations. Her research and commentary have appeared in the Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Foreign Policy, Foreign Affairs, US News and World Report, and elsewhere.

Andrea Lampros

Andrea Lampros is the Associate Director at the Human Rights Center, responsible for administration, fundraising, and communications, and the Resiliency Manager of the Human Rights Investigations Lab. She served for more than five years as the center’s Communications Director. In fall 2016, Andrea helped to launch the center’s Human Rights Investigations Lab, the first university-based effort of its kind. She continues to work closely with the lab students on resiliency to secondary trauma. Prior to joining the Human Rights Center, she worked on grassroots efforts related to U.S. policy in Central America and immigrant and refugee rights. She was a principal editor and chief proposal writer on the marketing and communications team at Berkeley’s University Relations, now University Development and Alumni Relations. She was the first development director for UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism. An alumna of Berkeley’s J-School, she spent more than a decade working as a newspaper reporter, magazine editor, and freelance writer. Her writing has appeared in the Contra Costa Times, East Bay Monthly, San Francisco Chronicle, Diablo Magazine, Huffington Post, California Journal, and other publications. She contributed a chapter about the labor movement to The Real Las Vegas: Life Beyond the Strip (Oxford University Press) and is currently collaborating on a chapter about the use of DNA in El Salvador’s search for disappeared children, forthcoming from Oxford University Press.

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Tuition

$2,550 USD

We continue to accept applications for future training! You will be the first to know when new date is determined.

We encourage team work! Bring a colleague or friend and receive additional tuition discounts. Contact advancedmedia@journalism.berkeley.edu for more information.

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When?

New Date Coming Soon

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Instruction begins promptly at 9:00 a.m.

Morning coffee and catered networking lunch provided.

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Where?

UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

121 North Gate Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720

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Prerequisites

-This is an introductory online course; no previous podcasting experience is required.

-Ability and willingness to learn new skills and work with new equipment and software.

-Basic computer literacy.

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Contact Person

Vicki Hammarstedt
advancedmedia@journalism.berkeley.edu
510-642-3892

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Questions & Additional Information


We suggest staying in the Berkeley area. Nearby hotels include:

– Faculty Club (on UC campus)
– Graduate Hotel
– Hotel Shattuck Plaza
– Bancroft Hotel
– Extended Stay America or Executive Inn and Suites
– La Posada Guest House

Many of our participants have also found luck with Airbnb.

We currently do not offer transfer option between workshops. 

• Cancellations must be received in writing by email to advancedmedia@journalism.berkeley.edu.

• Cancellations made up to 15 days prior to the start of the program registered for will receive a refund of all monies less the $375.00 cancellation fee. We are unable to refund any fees for registrations cancelled within two weeks of the start of training.

• Failure to appear for the training will result in forfeiture of the full course fee.

• Changes to the registration at anytime are only by approval of Berkeley Advanced Media Institute administration.

• The Berkeley Advanced Media Institute reserves the right to cancel or reschedule training due to low enrollment or other unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of Berkeley Advanced Media Institute. In this case, applicants are entitled to a full refund of the program fee.

• The Berkeley Advanced Media Institute will advise applicants at the earliest opportunity of changes to schedule program. The Berkeley Advanced Media Institute is not responsible for travel fees, or any expenses incurred as a result of cancelled programs.

We currently do not offer transfer option between workshops.